Liberty Review América Latina

Classical Liberalism in Guatemala

ANDRÉS MARROQUÍN AND FRITZ THOMAS
ECON JOURNAL WATCH 12.3 (2015): 460-478

Abstract: We give an account of classical liberalism in Guatemala, its successes, failures, and main figures. Classical liberalism is a young tradition in the country and relatively small. The three most important organizations are Universidad Francisco Marroquín, the Center for Economic and Social Studies (CEES), and the Center for National Economic Research (CIEN). The most important individual for liberalism in Guatemala has been Manuel Ayau, who passed away in 2010.

Filed under: Ciencia Política, Economía, Historia, Sociedad

Venezuela: Without Liberals, There Is No Liberalism

HUGO J. FARIA AND LEONOR FILARDO
ECON JOURNAL WATCH 12.3 (2015): 375-399

Abstract: The Venezuelan economy evolved from a growth miracle (1920–1957) to a growth disaster (1960 to the present). This paper describes the institutional collapse behind this reversal of fortunes. To cast light on Venezuela’s U-turn we provide a brief historical account, and we discuss the role played by educational organizations, the media and culture, and political and entrepreneurial elites in the destruction of liberal institutions. We also describe the most prominent liberal reactions to the pervasive institutional decay endured by the country. Finally, a major lesson emerges from this case study: illiberal mindsets coupled with the absence of leadership bring dire consequences for the people’s standard of living.

Filed under: Ciencia Política, Economía, Historia, Sociedad

Tracing the Reversal of Fortune in the Americas: Bolivian GDP Per Capita since the Mid-nineteenth Century

ALFONSO HERRANZ-LONCÁN, JOSÉ ALEJANDRO PERES-CAJÍAS
CLIOMETRICA (2015). ADVANCED ONLINE PUBLICATION. DOI
10.1007/s11698-015-0125-2

Abstract: In the centuries before the Spanish conquest, the Bolivian space was among the most highly urbanized and complex societies in the Americas. In contrast, in the early twenty-first century, Bolivia is one of the poorest economies on the continent. According to Acemoglu et al. (Q J Econ 117(4):1231–1294, 2002), this disparity between precolonial opulence and current poverty would make Bolivia a perfect example of “reversal of fortune” (RF). This hypothesis, however, has been criticized for oversimplifying long-term development processes by “compressing” history (Austin in J Int Dev 20:996–1027, 2008). Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Economía, Historia

Pre-Independence Spanish Americans: Poor, Short and Unequal…Or the Opposite?

RAFAEL DOBADO-GONZÁLEZ
REVISTA DE HISTORIA ECONÓMICA/JOURNAL OF IBERIAN AND LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (2015). ADVANCED ONLINE PUBLICATION. DOI: 10.1017/S0212610914000135

Abstract: This paper attempts to establish a debate between alternative views of living standards in Spanish America during the viceregal period. Since 2009, a growing literature has shared a «common language» based on a similar, though not identical, methodology. As never before, this «new generation» of studies is built upon long series of quantitative data and international comparisons of nominal wages and prices which, in some cases, cover the whole Early Modern Era. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Historia

Cádiz y el Experimento Constitucional Atlántico

JOSÉ ANTONIO AGUILAR RIVERA
POLÍTIC Y GOBIERNO 21.1 (2014): 3-24

Este trabajo analiza la pertenencia y el lugar de la Constitución de Cádiz dentro del conjunto de la experiencia constitucional atlántica. Después de ubicar contextualmente el debate historiográfico entre quienes reducían el resultado de la deliberación gaditana a meras imitaciones de códigos importados del extranjero y aquellos que argumentaban su defensa en términos nacionalistas e históricos, es posible posicionar el experimento de Cádiz más cerca del ciclo constitucional hispanoamericano que del francés o estadounidense. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Ciencia Política, Historia

Crises and Crashes: Argentina 1825-2002

ANA MARÍA CERRO, OSVALDO MELONI
REVISTA DE HISTORIA ECONOMICA / JOURNAL OF IBERIAN AND LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY 31.2 (2013): 219-252

The objective of this paper is twofold. First, it identifies and categorizes the currency crises suffered by Argentina from 1825 to 2002. Second, it looks for regularities in the behavior of key macroeconomic variables in the neighborhood of crises by means of graphic analysis, non-parametric and econometric techniques Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Economía, Historia

América Latina Archive

Recent Posts: Liberty Review

Economic Development, Mobility, and Political Discontent: An Experimental Test of Tocqueville’s Thesis in Pakistan

ANDREW HEALY, KATRINA KOSEC and CECILIA HYUNJUNG MO AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE REVIEW, Volume 111, Issue 3 Abstract: We consider the thesis of Alexis de Tocqueville (1856) that economic development and increased mobility may generate political discontent not present in more stagnant economies. For many citizens, as they become aware of the potential for improved living standards, their aspirations may […]

Max Scheler and Adam Smith on Sympathy

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A liberal theory of externalities?

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